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SITUation Report 9/98

The newsletter of the Society for the Investigation of the UNEXPLAINED, UK branch


A Note from the Editor

Dear friends,

Back to nice fonts again you'll be pleased to see! I'm preparing this issue at a mystery location - sorry about the long wait since last time, but as you can probably imagine things have been rather disrupted, and we're still working out quite how to organize our affairs in this new decentralized system.

Anyway, here are two wonderful articles from our field operatives, showing two of the different faces of what being in SITU is all about. More please!

Until next time,

Paula Derrow


SITU - Out in the Fields

Extract from the journal of Iain Blayne.

The incident that started off my interest in conspiracies occurred whilst I was on active service during the Gulf conflict. At the time I was a member of 148 Naval Artillery Troop, Royal Marine Commando (V), a TA unit whose wartime role is the direction of Navy munitions onto land targets.

My section had just spent the first two weeks of the air war designating Republican Guard targets in the south west of Kuwait for Coalition air strikes. We were then choppered into the northwest to do some recce work checking out suspected command sites.

The first few days went more or less as expected. We confirmed the existence of one site and the next day Coalition aircraft came in and flattened the place.

The following night we had a contact whilst on our way to the next OP, so we bugged out north and yomped until morning to put some distance between ourselves and the Iraqi's. Contrary to SOP's we camped down in a cave we found in some low hills.

Just before sunset we all stood to waiting for the night to settle in so we could move out. Half an hour later Andy came in from a quick recce saying that there were a couple of choppers milling around like they were looking for something. This of course meant that we had to stay stood to until things cleared up. We all promised to have Andy's balls if it was a wind up but we should have known better. He came from Vauxhall and is the most amazing bloke to have in your section. Give him fifteen minutes to 'tune in' to his surroundings and it's like having a psychic with you. He can see and hear stuff ages before anyone else.

Sure enough a couple of minutes later two Yank Pave Lows came in, landed nearby, and a couple of squads of guys got out. The Pave Low is the chopper their Special Forces use for insertion/extraction. It's a bloody big beast but has all sorts of electronics onboard to keep it out of trouble.

Our first thought was, "What the hell are these twats doing here?" but we decided to stay hidden and see what happened. We'd already heard some reports of Blue on Blue and weren't going to get shot by some trigger happy Redneck. Andy swore he heard another couple of choppers on patrol nearby but couldn't identify which sort.

Ten minutes after they landed another aircraft appeared. I do mean just appeared, as in from nowhere!

This thing was the size of a Herc and it just seemed to fall out of the sky in a vertical descent. Fifty feet off the deck it slowed down and then landed near the Pave Low's. It never made a damn noise. Totally silent. No engines. No downwash. No nothing! It was roughly triangular about twice as long as it was wide. I was reminded of the various pictures I'd seen of some of the early lifting body work the Yanks had done in the fifties and sixties.

At this point John Dwyer (the section I/C) got us to get out the cameras and start snapping. Things were too odd to just sit around and do nothing. We'd just gotten the gear ready when a door opened in the aircraft and out climbed a crewman. Nothing seemed strange until one of the Yanks went up for a chat. He towered above the bloke. Even assuming the squaddie was 6'6" this pilot can only have been about 4' nothing. That's when we noticed that the large head was not because of his flight helmet. OK he wore one, but it was really lightweight. His head was way out of proportion to his body.

By now the cameras are going like a paperatzy feeding frenzy, and we're all just swapping confused and disbelieving looks. Finally Mike mouthed over to me, "It's fucking ET! The Yanks have got ET doing their recce's for them!" None of us disagreed.

After a fifteen minute chat a couple of the Yanks climbed aboard with ET and the plane left. It slowly lifted to about ten feet and hovered for a couple of seconds before climbing straight up and vanishing. We heard the sonic boom a few seconds later. By now the Pave Lows were up and moving.

For a few seconds we all just stared at each other then John got us moving.

"Tony. Work out a route to a good exfil location, we're getting out of here."

"Iain. Contact HQ and advise them that we need extracting ASAP. SITREP to follow in ten."

Ten minutes later I called in the co-ordinates that we were to be picked up from. We had eight miles to cover in three hours.

Forty five minutes into the yomp Andy pulls up and goes to ground. We don't need to be told to follow his lead, so down we go covering our arcs and half of us pulling down our PNG's. The Passive Night Goggles can be useful at times although you can't use them for extended periods as they cause quite horrific eye strain.

All of a sudden we start taking fire from our front right. A helicopter! The fucking Yanks are back and have started having a go at us! The Iraqi's hadn't had a thing in the air for weeks that wasn't running to Iran.

I jump straight onto my TACBE, "Unknown helicopter, this is Romeo Mike Four Eight. We are a coalition ground callsign. We are not Iraqi. I say again we are a coalition ground callsign. Cease fire! Over!"

Almost immediately I got a reply

"Romeo Mike Four Eight this is Awacs Zero Four. I show no traffic in your location. Over."

"We are currently under attack by one, possibly two helicopters. Calls the twats off and tell 'em we're friendly! Over."

"I say again Romeo Mike Four Eight there is no traffic in your area. My scope is clean. Over."

By now John's had enough and ordered us to return fire. The section weapons are an even mix of Minimis and M16M203's. The 203 is a 40mm grenade launcher and can be quite accurate in the right hands, unfortunately mine are not. By now the attacker had moved in to a few hundred meters and we managed to get a couple of hits on it. I didn't have any PNG's so just fired in the same direction as the guys that did have them. It wasn't until after we gave it a few rounds that it started making any noise other than gunfire. We must've gotten lucky and hit an intake or something. Things weren't going so well for us. Johan had taken a hit in the chest and was dead, and John was wounded in the arm. We kept pouring fire into the thing and then suddenly it veered off to the left trailing smoke. That was our chance so we legged it before his mate turned up. We heard and saw the explosion a minute later and just piled on the speed.

Luckily for us there was no wingman and we managed to make the RV for our pickup.

Two days later we were all back in England and the MOD were acting as if nothing had happened!

We tried finding out where all our photos had gone but again were met with the blank looks of the uninterested.

Some time later we did manage to find out that the Awacs operator had told us the truth. Andy had met up with one of the crew at some show or other and got talking to them in the mess afterwards. They had seen absolutely nothing on their screens.

A week later we read about the tragic loss of an Awacs aircraft in a training exercise over the Nevada desert. This was the start of our worries. Sure enough it was the same crew that Andy had been speaking to.

Since then four members of the section have died under suspicious circumstances. The last being Mike Pederson found at Weston-super-Mare.


Dear SITUation Report,

Just thought I would write and tell you all about my recent jaunt in Mexico, a holiday destination I would recommends to any SITU member. It was terribly exciting and all that, and apart from a few rather strange companions and odd locals, I really enjoyed myself.

Well, where do I start? The hotel was first class, if you don't mind the refried beans for breakfast, lunch, and supper. The manager was a dreadfully nice chap, very helpful and everything. The weather was lovely, and I only regret that I could not get more of a tan. Our holiday guide was a lovely Mexican girl, very chatty and everything. On our holiday I really enjoyed the cliff diving, and I got to do a spot of cave diving as well. A few of my group were dreadfully boring and didn't take part, but you always get people like that on holidays don't you?

What else? Well, their local businessmen sold wonderful herbal products which I for one enjoyed immensely. They had some rather boring museums and such like, and some unfriendly natives as well, but you can't have everything, can you?

There was also some strange stuff about some local people who wanted to do a religious thingy and summon a god. Messy stuff really, and just a shame that it had to happen while we were there, because otherwise it could have been a truly wonderful holiday. These strange men kept following us around everywhere we went as well! Outrageous behaviour! The other chaps in the group did a lot of running around and getting worked up over things, but I just tried to let the whole thing wash over me and enjoy the holiday. An attitude that the rest really should have adopted, after all life is too short to worry about silly little things. Get your priorities right, that's what I say.

The only thing remaining to say is that it was a little more expensive than you would expect. Not that that bothers me, with my father's income, but it was amazing how much they charged for little bits of information. Anyone would think the locals knew I had money to burn! Overall I would rate the holiday at 7 out of 10. Book through your local travel agent, or just ask SITU if you can pop over to see Mexico.

Yours sincerely,

Rupert De Montfort


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